State boards and commissions are great way to get involved in making changes in Alaska

State boards and commissions are great way to get involved in making changes in Alaska

PHOTO: Chena Ridge from the Division of Forestry’s website. The Alaska Board of Forestry helps manage and determine policy for Alaska’s forest lands.

 

You don’t need to run for public office to have a real impact on life in Alaska and in the way the state does business.

Why not stick your name in for a state board or commission?

Monday January 6, 2014 Edition of The LegHead Report

 

RESOURCES: Here are some useful links to help you get info and apply for a board or commission position.

Governor’s Office of Boards and Commission

List of Active Boards and Commissions — includes a ton of info on each board, what they do, who’s on it, etc.

List of Vacancies on Alaska Boards and Commissions–These are the ones to target if you’re ready to take the leap and apply for an open spot.  (Opens as a pdf.)

How to Apply for an Alaska Board or Commission Position

 

LNG Gasline closer to reality with passage of SB138

LNG Gasline closer to reality with passage of SB138

A long-time goal of building a large-diameter gasline to provide natural gas to Alaskans and a new petroleum product to export is closer to becoming a reality with the passage of Senate Bill 138.

SB 138 was a key priority for Governor Sean Parnell who called its passage a historic event and the beginning of the Alaska LNG Project. The measure also gives Alaska an equity-share in the gasline.

“Alaskans have waited a long time for a gasline,” he said.

Governor Parnell’s Comments

The governor speaking on SB 138 during his first ever Virtual Town Hall Meeting held April 16.

Passage of SB 138 is the first in a series of actions that must be taken over the next four to five years to allow for the development of Alaska’s North Slope natural gas resources.

That comes from a 24-page report produced for the legislature that analyzes, explains and discusses the key issues involved in building the LNG pipeline.

SB 138 both authorizes certain negotiations and provides a broad roadmap for how the Legislature will oversee and consent to these negotiations, the report summarizes.

  Currently, the project consists of three related mega-projects. They include:

  • a gas treatment plant on the North Slope,
  • an 800-mile large-diameter pipeline from the North Slope to Nikiski, and
  • an LNG export facility at Nikiski.
  • Another major component calls for at least five off-take points for gas consumption within the state.

If all goes well, the gasline could be completed by 2020.

Resources:

Senate Passes Historic Legislation to Advance Alaska LNG Project

Frequently Asked Questions about the Alaska LNG Project report by Mayer & Tsafos

 Alaska Gasline Development Corporation Website

Top Photo: Courtesy ConocoPhillips

Alaska Legislature approves measure to help small refineries HB 287

House Bill 287 began as a way to help small refineries–namely Petro Star, which operates two refineries.
However, it ends up the measure helps the state’s largest refinery Tesoro.
Democratic Senators label HB287 “This Year’s Giveaway.”

A measure approved by the Alaska Legislature would help small refineries to stay in business by providing tax credits and subsidies.

House Bill 287 was created with the intention of helping Petro Star stay in business. Petro Star, which is a subsidiary of the Arctic Slope Native Corporation and owns two refineries had asked for assistance from the state.

The measure came under attack by critics because it doesn’t limit the financial help to refineries in need, thus making the state’s largest refinery in Nikiski—which is owned by Tesoro—eligible for the financial benefits of the bill.

In fact, HB 287 earned the distinction of being named “This Year’s Giveaway” by the Democratic Senators.

In a press availability held shortly after the end of the legislative session, Governor Sean Parnell avoided mentioning the controversy, and instead focused on the need to keep Alaska’s small refineries viable…

Gov. Sean Parnell’s comments…

Governor Sean Parnell commenting on HB 287.

Governor Parnell: State must pay down pension debt

Alaska State of the State Address 2014

Photo from Gavel Alaska’s video of Alaska 2014 State of the State Address.

The LegHead Report Radio Show for Thurs. Jan 23 State Pension Funding

 

Alaska’s financial situation is secure, but there is one huge debt looming over Alaskans that must be dealt with. That was a key statement from Alaska Governor Sean Parnell in his State of the State Address to a joint session of the Alaska Legislature.

The big debt is unfunded state pensions and if it is not tackled soon Alaskan will struggle to keep up with an ever-growing burden that sucks more and more available funds from other budget items.

Gov. Sean Parnell’s comments in State of State Address 2014 courtesy of Gavel Alaska.

Governor Sean Parnell speaking during Wednesday’s State of the State Address to the Alaska Legislature. Thanks to Gavel Alaska for today’s audio.

RESOURCES:

360 North / Gavel Alaska video of Alaska State of the State Address 2014

 

 

Governor declares flooded areas disaster

Declaration declared for Eagle, Circle, Galena and Fort Yukon.

 

 

Spring Flooding Impacts Multiple Communities

From Governor’s website–printed as posted at gov.ak.gov

May 31, 2013, Anchorage, Alaska – Governor Sean Parnell today signed a declaration of a disaster emergency after surveying flooding and meeting with Alaskans in Galena. The governor traveled to Galena earlier this week. Governor Parnell considered the flooding that took place in Eagle, Circle, and Fort Yukon in his decision to declare a disaster.

Major General Thomas H. Katkus, commissioner of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs, traveled with the governor.

“During my visit to Galena this week, I saw firsthand how heartfelt neighbors help each other during and after disasters in Alaska,” Governor Parnell said. “Keeping Alaskans safe and restoring them to their homes remains my top priority. While the full extent of this disaster is unknown, it is apparent that the devastating flooding will require more state assistance for residents to recover. As the flood waters recede in Galena, we stand ready to help other communities affected by spring break-up flooding.”

Excessive snow pack and ice thickness throughout the Interior and eastern Alaska, combined with rapid spring warming has caused ice jams and severe flooding in communities along the Yukon River.

The Native Community of Circle and the City of Fort Yukon have issued declarations of local disaster emergencies.

The State Emergency Operation Center is at Level 3, indicating an event is taking place. Two emergency management specialists remain in Galena to assist with emergency response. The American Red Cross of Alaska and the Tanana Chiefs Conference are supporting those evacuated.

A copy of the declaration

More Photos

Governor Parnell Surveys GalenGovernor Parnell Surveys GalenGovernor Parnell Surveys GalenGovernor Parnell Surveys Galen