Why not put your name in for a state board or commission

Boards and commissions offer you a great opportunity to really have a say in a part of the state operation that you are most interested in. It’s a way to make some serious changes in the lives of many Alaskans.

 

Sure you have to put together a resume and brag on yourself, which I know is hard for many people. And you risk the possibility of being passed over, which really stinks. But, the benefits far outweigh the problems you might encounter.

Since I’m so hot to have people put their names in…I am now- officially offering to help you write you resume and fill out that form you need to to apply for a position. I’ll even coach you along. Hold your hand if you want. Really. I’d love to do it. Just send me an email at yomaggie@leghead.com. The address is at the bottom of our website.

Resources:

Governor’s press release with everyone’s names on it so you can see who all got appointed to which boards, etc.

How to apply for position on an Alaska board or commission

Place to get information on the various Alaska boards and commissions and how to apply

From the site:  Send a completed boards and commissions application, a resume and a brief letter explaining your desire to serve the State of Alaska, to:

  • Office of Governor Sean Parnell
    Attention: Jason Hooley, Director of Boards & Commissions
    P.O. Box 110001, Juneau, Alaska 99811-0001
  • To contact the Boards and Commissions office
    By phone: (907) 269-7450
    By facsimile: (907) 269-7461
    By email: boards@alaska.gov

For further information, contact the staff of the Office of Boards and Commissions at (907) 269-7450 or at boards@alaska.gov.

First Woman to Run For Alaska Governor

 

More info on Victoria Woodhull, First Woman to Run for President of U.S.

Wikipedia

 

Alaska Statehood Act Anniversary on Monday 30th

June 30, 1958 – Date of Senate passage of Alaska Statehood Act
July 7, 1958 – FDR signs Statehood Act
Jan. 3, 1959 – Alaska becomes 49th state

 

We're In Alaska Statehood passed by U.S. Senate

This  “We’re In” photo was taken on June 30, 1958 the day the U.S. Senate passed The Alaska Statehood Act.

The famous photo, above, was taken the next day after the paper was flown to Washington, D.C.

The Statehood Act didn’t go into effect immediately–Alaska actually became a state in January 1959.

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Today (June 30) is the anniversary of the day in 1958 when the U.S. Senate passed the Alaska Statehood Act which brought Alaska into the Union. The measure was signed by President Eisenhower on July 7, 1958 and Alaska became the 49th state on Jan. 3, 1959.

You’ve probably seen the famous statehood photo. The one of the big two-word headline: “We’re In.” That headline was printed on the cover of the Anchorage paper of that day.

Well, here’s an interesting tidbit you may not know about that photo—the one with the officials holding the newspaper.

While the headline was printed on June 30th, the photo itself was taken on July 1st—in Washington, D.C.

That could be arranged in this day of high speed jets and special courier services. But back in 1958, that was some feat.

Special editions of the historic paper were flown to Washington, D.C. by jet bomber for distribution to Washington officials.

There’s a photo in the Alaska Digital Archives of President Eisenhower and Alaska Territorial Governor Mike Stepovich holding a copy of that paper in Washington, D.C. on July 1st. The day after it was printed in Anchorage.

This week on The LegHead Report we’ll be remembering the signing of the Alaska Statehood Act with stories from our archives about statehood.

And speaking of Archives, the Alaska Digital Archives has a copy of the “We’re In” photo as well as thousands of others. The digital archives also has audio and video covering all periods of Alaska history.

Plan to spend a lot of time there if you go. There is so much to look at and enjoy.

 

Alaska Digital Archives

 

Alaska Legislature approves measure to help small refineries HB 287

House Bill 287 began as a way to help small refineries–namely Petro Star, which operates two refineries.
However, it ends up the measure helps the state’s largest refinery Tesoro.
Democratic Senators label HB287 “This Year’s Giveaway.”

A measure approved by the Alaska Legislature would help small refineries to stay in business by providing tax credits and subsidies.

House Bill 287 was created with the intention of helping Petro Star stay in business. Petro Star, which is a subsidiary of the Arctic Slope Native Corporation and owns two refineries had asked for assistance from the state.

The measure came under attack by critics because it doesn’t limit the financial help to refineries in need, thus making the state’s largest refinery in Nikiski—which is owned by Tesoro—eligible for the financial benefits of the bill.

In fact, HB 287 earned the distinction of being named “This Year’s Giveaway” by the Democratic Senators.

In a press availability held shortly after the end of the legislative session, Governor Sean Parnell avoided mentioning the controversy, and instead focused on the need to keep Alaska’s small refineries viable…

Gov. Sean Parnell’s comments…

Governor Sean Parnell commenting on HB 287.

LNG Gasline closer to reality with passage of SB138

LNG Gasline closer to reality with passage of SB138

A long-time goal of building a large-diameter gasline to provide natural gas to Alaskans and a new petroleum product to export is closer to becoming a reality with the passage of Senate Bill 138.

SB 138 was a key priority for Governor Sean Parnell who called its passage a historic event and the beginning of the Alaska LNG Project. The measure also gives Alaska an equity-share in the gasline.

“Alaskans have waited a long time for a gasline,” he said.

Governor Parnell’s Comments

The governor speaking on SB 138 during his first ever Virtual Town Hall Meeting held April 16.

Passage of SB 138 is the first in a series of actions that must be taken over the next four to five years to allow for the development of Alaska’s North Slope natural gas resources.

That comes from a 24-page report produced for the legislature that analyzes, explains and discusses the key issues involved in building the LNG pipeline.

SB 138 both authorizes certain negotiations and provides a broad roadmap for how the Legislature will oversee and consent to these negotiations, the report summarizes.

  Currently, the project consists of three related mega-projects. They include:

  • a gas treatment plant on the North Slope,
  • an 800-mile large-diameter pipeline from the North Slope to Nikiski, and
  • an LNG export facility at Nikiski.
  • Another major component calls for at least five off-take points for gas consumption within the state.

If all goes well, the gasline could be completed by 2020.

Resources:

Senate Passes Historic Legislation to Advance Alaska LNG Project

Frequently Asked Questions about the Alaska LNG Project report by Mayer & Tsafos

 Alaska Gasline Development Corporation Website

Top Photo: Courtesy ConocoPhillips