Oct. 12 is Benny Benson’s Birthday

Oct. 12 is Benny Benson’s Birthday

The LegHead Report: Benny Benson on Flag Design from Anch Boro School Dist.

Today’s show includes part of an interview with Benson conducted by the old Anchorage Borough School District.

Benson designed Alaska’s Territorial Flag

which became the state flag

Don’t you just love the story of Benny Benson and his Alaska flag design?

BennyBenson holding his flag. Alaska State Library. From UA Journey website.

BennyBenson holding his flag. Alaska State Library. From UA Journey website.

There’s Benny, growing up in an orphanage and he ends up designing a flag that is generally accepted by flag experts to be a nearly perfect design. Simple, colorful, easily distinguished from others. Plus, there’s a good story about the North Star and of course Benny’s great story related to the flag itself.

Here’s an interesting twist to the Benny Benson Flag Story. In this interview conducted by the Anchorage Borough School District, Benson says his original flag design included the date 1867 under the Big Dipper. 1867 is the year of the Alaska Purchase from Russia.  Benson says they made that small change when they finalized the design for the state flag…

Benson’s comments

That’s Benny Benson speaking in a video that’s available at the Alaska State Museum. It was originally recorded by the Anchorage Borough School District. The borough merged into the Municipality of Anchorage back in 1975.

Since Benson died in 1972, this video is more than 35 years old. Benson was born in 1913 and was 13 years old when he won the state flag contest.

He was living at the Jesse Lee Children’s Home in Seward at the time of the contest.

References:

From the North American Vexillological Association — The people who specialize in flag design.

Five Basic Tips for Good Flag Designs — Benny’s flag had them all!

1.  Keep It Simple
The flag should be so simple that a child can draw it from memory…

2.  Use Meaningful Symbolism
The flag’s images, colors, or patterns should relate to what it symbolizes…

3.  Use 2–3 Basic Colors
Limit the number of colors on the flag to three, which contrast well and come from the standard color set…

4.  No Lettering or Seals
Never use writing of any kind or an organization’s seal…

5.  Be Distinctive or Be Related
Avoid duplicating other flags, but use similarities to show connections…

Interesting material in “The Face Behind the Name” from University of Alaska Journal.

BennyBenson as an adult. Source Unk. From UA Journey website.

BennyBenson as an adult. Source Unk. From UA Journey website.

 

Wednesday is Constitution Day

Wednesday is Constitution Day

Photo courtesy Constitution Week USA.com

 

How much do you know about the U.S. Constitution?

 

Here’s a great resource: Lesson Plans and Activities for Constitution Week from the Constitution Center.

The LegHead Report for Wed. Sept. 17 Constitution Day — School House Rock

The LegHead Report for Thurs. Sept. 18 –  We the People

The LegHead Report for Fri. Sept. 19 — Constitution Facts

 

Can you pass the U.S.  Naturalization Test?

 

 

National Guard Report Released

National Guard Report Released

Graph Above: Percentage of Alaska National Guard survey participants who perceive three or more barriers to reporting sexual assaults within the guard.

 

The top officer of the Alaska National Guard was forced out by Governor Sean Parnell following last week’s release of the finding of an investigation of misconduct and sexual assault of Alaska Guard members.

Governor Sean Parnell released the findings Sept. 4, and took the resignation of the adjutant general, Major General Thomas H. Katkus.

 

The LegHead Report for Mon. Sept. 8 Gov. Parnell releases findings of special report.  1 of 5 Parts

The LegHead Report for Tues. Sept. 9 Gov. Special report find most National Guard members see barriers to reporting sexual assaults.  2 of 5 Parts

 

Link to Governor’s Press Release on Alaska National Guard

Link to Video of Press Conference

Link to Special Investigator’s Report

What would your family do if…

What would your family do if…

September is National Emergency Preparedness Month

Are you and your family prepared?

What if you had 20 minutes to get your family out and away from danger? Do you know what you would need to bring? Where to go? What about the kids? Where are they? Are they safe?

State of Alaska Emergency Prep site – This site is the “umbrella site” for everything from family safety to hazardous materials spills.

State’s Page for General Emergency Prep including Prep Activities for Children

7-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit – How to and what to include

Emergency Kit Info in Yupik

NOAA Website on Safety

Ready.Gov is the best site for general Emergency Prep Info

Red Cross Mobile Aps for eveything from dog first aid to earthquakes

LNG Gasline closer to reality with passage of SB138

LNG Gasline closer to reality with passage of SB138

A long-time goal of building a large-diameter gasline to provide natural gas to Alaskans and a new petroleum product to export is closer to becoming a reality with the passage of Senate Bill 138.

SB 138 was a key priority for Governor Sean Parnell who called its passage a historic event and the beginning of the Alaska LNG Project. The measure also gives Alaska an equity-share in the gasline.

“Alaskans have waited a long time for a gasline,” he said.

Governor Parnell’s Comments

The governor speaking on SB 138 during his first ever Virtual Town Hall Meeting held April 16.

Passage of SB 138 is the first in a series of actions that must be taken over the next four to five years to allow for the development of Alaska’s North Slope natural gas resources.

That comes from a 24-page report produced for the legislature that analyzes, explains and discusses the key issues involved in building the LNG pipeline.

SB 138 both authorizes certain negotiations and provides a broad roadmap for how the Legislature will oversee and consent to these negotiations, the report summarizes.

  Currently, the project consists of three related mega-projects. They include:

  • a gas treatment plant on the North Slope,
  • an 800-mile large-diameter pipeline from the North Slope to Nikiski, and
  • an LNG export facility at Nikiski.
  • Another major component calls for at least five off-take points for gas consumption within the state.

If all goes well, the gasline could be completed by 2020.

Resources:

Senate Passes Historic Legislation to Advance Alaska LNG Project

Frequently Asked Questions about the Alaska LNG Project report by Mayer & Tsafos

 Alaska Gasline Development Corporation Website

Top Photo: Courtesy ConocoPhillips

Why not put your name in for a state board or commission

Boards and commissions offer you a great opportunity to really have a say in a part of the state operation that you are most interested in. It’s a way to make some serious changes in the lives of many Alaskans.

 

Sure you have to put together a resume and brag on yourself, which I know is hard for many people. And you risk the possibility of being passed over, which really stinks. But, the benefits far outweigh the problems you might encounter.

Since I’m so hot to have people put their names in…I am now- officially offering to help you write you resume and fill out that form you need to to apply for a position. I’ll even coach you along. Hold your hand if you want. Really. I’d love to do it. Just send me an email at yomaggie@leghead.com. The address is at the bottom of our website.

Resources:

Governor’s press release with everyone’s names on it so you can see who all got appointed to which boards, etc.

How to apply for position on an Alaska board or commission

Place to get information on the various Alaska boards and commissions and how to apply

From the site:  Send a completed boards and commissions application, a resume and a brief letter explaining your desire to serve the State of Alaska, to:

  • Office of Governor Sean Parnell
    Attention: Jason Hooley, Director of Boards & Commissions
    P.O. Box 110001, Juneau, Alaska 99811-0001
  • To contact the Boards and Commissions office
    By phone: (907) 269-7450
    By facsimile: (907) 269-7461
    By email: boards@alaska.gov

For further information, contact the staff of the Office of Boards and Commissions at (907) 269-7450 or at boards@alaska.gov.